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Tektite

Formation

When a large meteorite strikes the Earth, tektite may be formed, fusing extraterrestrial stone with melted local rock. The word “Tektite” comes from the Greek, tektos, meaning “molten.”

Tektites may be found on earth within a narrow equatorial belt. Four well-known strewnfields (impact and dispersal sites) exist, and each is home to its own specific type of tektite. The North American strewnfield reaches from Georgia to Texas. The Moldavite strewnfield is located in Europe, while the Ivory Coast on the western shores of Africa is home to another. The Australasian strewnfield reaches from southern Australia up to southern China. Most tektites appear black with a heavily pitted surface; Australasian tektites sometimes reveal a goldish color along their thinner edges when seen with a black light.

Metaphysical Properties

The “Inkstone of the Thundergod” was how the ancient Chinese referred to tektites. Australian Aborigines call them Mabon or “magic,” and believe that finding one brings good luck. In India, these stones are known as the Sacred Gems of Krishna.

Tektites are considered charms of good luck and abundance, useful for raising one’s vibrations and strengthening the aura. Regular work with tektite may activate and enhance psychic abilities. The stone also assists one in the attainment of knowledge as well as the learning of lessons throughout life’s journey.

Tektite is said to create a powerful energetic link between the lowest and highest chakras, facilitating the free flow of energy throughout the subtle bodies. Working with tektite in daily life helps one to discern between truth and falsehood. Use tektite during meditation to expand consciousness beyond current limitations, as well as to bring deeper insights into present situations or problems. This stone may also help those suffering from depression brought on by fear.

Note: Tektite should not be used with animals or children.

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